Sunday, December 13, 2015

Book Review: Did I Mention I Love You?

Title Did I Mention I Love You?

Series The DIMILY Trilogy, book 1

Author Estelle Maskame

Release Date December 1, 2015

When sixteen-year-old Eden Munro agrees to spend the summer with her estranged father in the beachfront city of Santa Monica, California, she has no idea what she’s letting herself in for. Eden's parents are divorced and have gone their separate ways, and now her father has a brand new family. For Eden, this means she's about to meet three new step-brothers. The eldest of the three is Tyler Bruce, a troubled teenager with a short temper and a huge ego. Complete polar opposites, Eden quickly finds herself thrust into a world full of new experiences as Tyler's group of friends take her under their wing. But the one thing she just can't understand is Tyler, and the more she presses to figure out the truth about him, the more she finds herself falling for the one person she shouldn't – her step-brother.

Throw in Tyler's clingy girlfriend and a guy who has his eyes set on Eden, and there's secrets, lies and a whole lot of drama. But how can Eden keep her feelings under control? And can she ever work out the truth about Tyler?

Did I Mention I Love You is the first book in the phenomenal DIMILY trilogy, following the lives of Eden Munro and Tyler Bruce as they try to find their way in an increasingly confusing world.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25063750-did-i-mention-i-love-you
Review

For some people, unlikable characters completely ruin a book. However, I'm not one of them. I don't mind unlikable characters. Sometimes, I really enjoy them. I like books that mirror real life. In real life, people are messy. They make mistakes, they make questionable choices, they don't follow a specific predetermined path. They're FLAWED. My biggest request when dealing with unlikable characters is this... A character doesn't have to be likable, but I need to understand WHY they act they way they do. It's not justification for their actions that I need, just an understanding. However, after all of that is said, is there ever a point in which a character is just too unlikable? Is there a point in which no matter of understanding can excuse a characters behavior? Apparently so.

These characters completely ruined the story for me. Tyler is flat out toxic. He has no regard for anyone but himself. I get it, you've got issues. Doesn't excuse the fact that you're a complete douchebag. Eden seemed so... ugh. I just can't with her. She supposedly didn't like partying and drinking and all of that, but yet couldn't be bothered to do anything but go along with her new "friends." And what in the hell is up with the parents in this book? Are there actually parents out there that deal with their children this way? I mean, get angry that your kid is lying and getting arrested and partying and who knows what else... and everything is completely fine in a couple of hours? Ground your kid, but yet allow them to continue to do whatever they want? Really? And you wonder why your children behave the way that they do... okay. Ridiculous.

We do see some much needed character redemption in the epilogue. By the end of everything, I felt hopeful for the next two books. Perhaps not all is lost for Tyler and Eden?

What I find most interesting about the entire thing, though, is the writing. I really enjoyed the writing. It's clear that Estelle Maskame is a talented writer. There's so much potential here. So, while the characters ruined the story for me, the writing saved the book. So while I'll read the other two books to find out how things continue for Tyler and Eden, I'm really looking forward to seeing what else Estelle can come up with.

Rating

3 out of 5 stars

* This book was received from Sourcebooks Fire via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. *

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